guitarists | difference between acoustic and electroacoustic guitar

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ACOUSTIC AND ELECTROACOUSTIC GUITAR

Basically the two guitars are the same, as both guitars sound acoustically without the need to connect to any device.

But electroacoustic guitars have electronics to amplify the sound and can be plugged into a guitar amp or PA.

If you are a guitarist who only plays at home or in small gatherings, an acoustic guitar is more than enough. But if you play or plan to play live in front of more people, then an electro-acoustic guitar would be the best option.

Electroacoustic guitars usually have a device (transducer) that picks up vibrations of the strings and transforms them into electrical impulses. These are known as ¨pickups¨.

Besides pickups they also include a preamp and a equalizer that raises the strength of the elecAcoustic guitar Giovanni Sirias Blogtrical signal and allows the guitarist to adjust the signal frequencies before they are sent to the guitar amp or PA, having in this way, line level signal sent to the main PA.

Electro-acoustic guitars are priced slightly higher than their acoustic counterparts due to the electronics they bring with them. The better the quality of pickups and preamp the higher the price.

 

 

 

“An acoustic guitar can be transformed into an electro-acoustic guitar by adding pickups.”

An acoustic guitar can be transformed into an electro-acoustic guitar by adding these pickups and preamp. You´ll just have to buy the preamp and pay a luthier for the installation.

Another way to amplify an acoustic guitar is by placing a microphone close to the soundhole, but then you will need to know how to position the microphone and use one that is specialized in amplifying instruments like this one.

electroacoustic guitar Giovanni Sirias Blog

In the end if you are going to work often in places where you need to amplify your instrument, I still would recommend investing in an electro-acoustic guitar.

Which one do you prefer?

 

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5 THINGS YOU NEED TO TAKE TO A GIG

There are several “non music related” stuff that every musician should carry when gigging. Here a few:

01

DUCT TAPE

For fixing on the go when there are not replacements near. It can help sticking a sign to a wall, holding a light stand to the floor when to unstable or windy or cover a hole in a bag! Always handy.

02

WD40

Yes. To lubricate stuck parts of musical gear. I live in the tropics and near the beach. Humidity causes oxidation in all metal parts, mic stands, light stands, guitar parts, you name it. A little of WD40 can help a lot to keep moisture out of the gear. And also will loose any stuck screw or knob! Ask your drummer and he´ll tell you.

03

Basic Tools

A couple of screwdrivers, wire cutter, knife and pliers are needed very often. To save some space and weight, invest in those multi purpose tools that come in a blade style shape with scissors, saw and more.

04

Extra Cables

You don´t know when one of yours will stop working. XLRs, 1/4s and power extensions.

05

Hand Towels

And rags to wipe your face and clean the gear. Gear gets dusty and your face sweaty when setting up and when singing and performing. Dry your face!

 

 

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6 TIPS WHEN SETTING UP AT A GIG

As a beginner musician gigging for the first times, keeping a record of what to do and take to a gig can be overwhelming. Some tips here that might be common sense but they happen to be forgotten very often.

01

Check your gear before going to the gig

Check that cables are working properly, lights are turning on, any loose screw on mic stands, knobs and faders on mixers and amps, old strings that might break, that drink spill you didn´t wipe from last gig, etc. Make sure everything is working. Sometimes power extensions are broken. And of course clean all gear to make it look good.

02

Help setting up and tearing down

If you are in a small band like most musicians in the world, then probably you don´t pay roadies to save money or perhaps the budget is too tight. So help setting and packing so everybody works the same. Bandmates will thank you for it. No reason to be mad at other band members over work load.

03

Carry and Use your tuner

Many guitarists forget to bring one and keep asking for one. That consumes time and might annoy the other band members.

04

Always wear shoes

Loading heavy gear and working with electricity is not a good combo for working with flip flops, wet shoes or worse, barefoot. We are always touching live cables when performing so we might get electrocuted. When moving gear you might slip or let one fall on your feet causing you injuries.

05

Turn the mixer on first

This is the proper way when powering up a house PA, first turn on the mixer and then the power amp or active speakers. At the end turn off the speakers or power amp first, and for last turn off the mixer. By doing it the opposite way, usually speakers might get damaged.

06

Bring your instrument

It sounds silly but it has happened to me and several band members! Specially when rushing.

 

how to create a setlist

HOW TO PICK THE SONGS FOR YOUR SETLIST

When getting ready to perform bands create a setlist as a guide for all band members, making them be in sync as to what to play.
But how do bands choose the songs to play? Here are some guides.

01

IGNITE THEM

Start with a high energy song. It´ll boost the audience stamina, creating expectation.

02

COOL DOWN

After 3 or 4 songs include the slower songs, the ballads, the deeper songs. That will change the mood and will create contrast.

03

BRING THE ENERGY BACK

End the set with your most energetic songs to add a big finale. That will leave the public wanting more.

04

BE READY

Always keep a couple of songs under the sleeve to play in case the audience requests for an encore.

05

YES, WAGON WHEEL!

If you play in a cover band, make sure to know the most requested songs ever. There will be always one shouting in the back for wagon wheel!

 

 

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